13.–19.01.2020 for all: 17.–19.01.2020

#immcologne

All winners and nominees of the Pure Talents Contest 2019 at the imm cologne

Will Cook

Portrait Will Cook

Will Cook is an Industrial Designer based in Auckland, New Zealand. Originally from Bedfordshire (UK), he moved to New Zealand in 2013 where he started a Bachelor of Design (Hons) in Industrial Design at Massey University in Wellington, graduating with First Class Honours in 2018. His passion for design comes from the delight he feels when creating useful products for people that really need them.

CLICK | Will Cook
Click by Will Cook

Photo: Will Cook; Koelnmesse

Q&As

Which ‘directions for use’ would you supply with your product?
Simply take home, click together in seconds and enjoy.

What do you think is your product’s field/application/context?
Portable Furniture Design for high density living.

When developing this product, was your main starting point the material, the shape or the function?
Function.

What is the story behind your product? Was there a reason, a task, an inspiration, a desire?
It all started in my third year of study. I was working at a designer furniture store and renting in a damp and cold flat with low quality furniture that was falling apart. I was frustrated with not being able to afford high quality designer furniture. I set out to design a quality product that is accessible to young professionals and students.

What do you think are the current trends in design and interior design?
Sustainability is and of course should be the first and foremost concern in any design work. There is a huge movement towards exploring new materials and processes to make use of waste materials or reduce the resources used in manufacturing. There is also more concern with a products life after use and designers are starting to consider how to deal with this aspect through the design process.
Design for small spaces is another area being tackled by designers. As our population continues to increase so do high density living situations and there has become much more demand for design that optimises these spaces.

Why were you interested in the Pure Talents Contest?
It is a fantastic opportunity to exhibit products and ideas to a huge and diverse audience. It’s also a great chance to network, not only with industry professionals but with fellow young designers.

Video Will Cook

Giuseppe Arezzi

Portrait Giuseppe Arezzi

Giuseppe Arezzi, born 1993, owns a post-graduate degree in Interior Design. After graduating in Interior Design at the Politecnico di Milano, he collaborated for several years with some renowned design studios such as Francesco Faccin and Emanuele Magenta in Milan. Working in the fields of Product and Interior Design in 2017 he established his own studio, based between Milan and Ragusa (Italy).

Binomio | Giuseppe Arezzi

Binomio is a hybrid piece, a two-sided object consisting of three simple shelves placed at different heights from the floor. It is multifunctional: it can be used as a desk or as a wardrobe, but can also be a table for dining alone, a bench to take off your shoes, a hanger, a bedside table, a bookshelf, an altar or a prie-dieu, as well as a support for any type of object. Binomio is made of solid, lacquered beech wood.

Product Giuseppe Arezzi

Foto: Studio Giunta; Giuseppe Arezzi; Koelnmesse

Q&As

Which ‘directions for use’ would you supply with your product?
Binomio is a hybrid furniture piece: it can be used as a desk or as a dressing room, but it can also be a table for dining alone, a bench to take off your shoes as you enter the house, a hanger, a bedside table, a bookshelf, an altar or a prie-dieu, as well as a support for any type of object.

What do you think is your product’s field/application/context?
I think that we are living in an era where we’re all nomad people. This is the era of Airbnb where a house can become a hotel, a coffee shop can become an office and so on. Binomio is conceived to be used in this kind of hybrid living spaces. You can put this object in an Airbnb room, in a hotel room, in a small flat or also in a lobby or in a coffee shop.

When developing this product, was your main starting point the material, the shape or the function?
I always start my projects with an anthropological and sociological research where the contemporary man is the main character. Thanks to this research I always try to find new functions and new ways to design a new object.

What is the story behind your product? Was there a reason, a task, an inspiration, a desire?
I developed Binomio during my one-month residency in Paris, where I focused my attention on a particular type of Parisian housing which is still in use: the Chambre de Bonne. The Chambres de Bonne are small apartments located in the attics of the bourgeois buildings built at the beginning of the 19th century. The literal translation of the term is “maid’s room”: these small lodgings – no larger than 10 square meters – were in fact intended for servants. Today they are occupied mostly by young people like students or temporary workers. The residency period in Paris was fundamental for my study of these small apartments and of the people who inhabit them, having everything that is necessary for survival within a few square meters: a small kitchenette, a sofa bed, a table or desk, a shower and some appliances. The few pieces of furniture are often used to perform more than one function and to intelligently inhabit the available space. Binomio is the piece of furniture that can translate into an object the spatial features of the Chambre de Bonne.

What do you think are the current trends in design and interior design?
I don’t like to speak about trends, I think that design shouldn’t have trends, that are more related to the fashion industry. Unfortunately we are living in a hyper-decorative design period. Otherwise there are some interesting design studios that are seriously working on all the themes related to sustainability. In general when we design something new, as designers, we have to think more about the life cycle of an object, the materials we have to use and if we seriously need that new object we’re designing.

Why were you interested in the Pure Talents Contest?
I think that imm cologne is one of the most important events in the design world, and as a young designer I think that the Pure Talents Contest could be a good platform where I can compare myself with other international designers of my generation, and of course I would like to get in contact with some leading companies to start a dialogue with them and hopefully start new collaborations.

Video Giuseppe Arezzi

Daan De Wit

Portrait Daan De Wit

Daan De Wit, born 1995, is a Belgian furnish designer. He holds a post-graduate degree in furniture design from the university college Thomas More Mechelen. In January 2019 he established his own studio, Daan De Wit Design Studio, and is working at the same time as a freelance furniture designer with other studios and as guest lecturer at the LUCA School of Arts - Campus Sint-Lukas in Brussels.

Stratum Tempus | Daan De Wit

Stratum Tempus is a vase collection based on a self-developed, ecological and material-conscious technique. By laser-cutting sheet material such as 100% recycled acrylic or bamboo into concentric, thin layers, conical and organically shaped objects are created with less material and almost no waste. The spiral shape creates a natural elegance. As a result, they have no facade and are changeable when moving, creating a dynamic experience in space.

Produkt Daan De Wit

Photo: Daan De Wit; Koelnmesse

Q&As

Which ‘directions for use’ would you supply with your product?
Vase, but also as a sculptural object in space.

What do you think is your product’s field?
Living space

When developing this product, was your main starting point the material, the shape or the function?
Material

What is the story behind your product? Was there a reason, a task, an inspiration, a desire?
Two years ago I worked six months on the context of veneer. I developed a technique that enabled me to convert a small amount of veneer into hollow, conical objects with minimal waste production. I now apply this technique to all kinds of board materials in order to discover new boundaries. The technique revolves around material awareness, frugality and waste.

What do you think are the current trends in design and interior design?
Ecology and sustainability are important terms. I am convinced that a contemporary designer cannot and should not design without these terms in mind. As a designer, you have a responsibility not to just bring new products into the world. Formality is of the past, sustainability is now.

Why were you interested in the Pure Talents Contest?
I am convinced that as a designer, and certainly as a recent graduate, you have to seize all the opportunities that present themselves. The Pure Talents Contest is a very interesting one, because it is free. This means that everyone get the same chances and more designers are submitting their products. The level of submission increases as a result.

Produkt Daan De Wit

Photo: Daan De Wit; Koelnmesse

Thalea Schmalenberg and Kasper Friis Egelund

Portrait Schmalenberg und Egelund

Thalea Schmalenberg (born in 1992) from Bonn, Germany, and Kasper Friis Egelund (born in 1995) from Denmark met on a six-week cooperation project at The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Schools of Architecture, Design and Conservation (KADK), in Copenhagen, where they are both currently completing their Master’s in Furniture & Object Design.

Fold | Thalea Schmalenberg and Kasper Friis Egelund

Inspired by the simple shape of a paper fan, Fold combines the familiar accessory with a contemporary light solution. By unfolding and placing the paper shade into the aluminium stand, the table lamp enhances this pleasant yet playful interaction between subject and object. Fold contrasts paper and metal, traditional craftsmanship and industrial design, hereby finding an aesthetic balance between feminine and masculine connoted materials.

Fold | Thalea Schmalenberg (D) und Kasper Friis Egelund (DK)

Photo: Thalea Schmalenberg, Kasper Friis Egelund; Koelnmesse

Q&As

Which ‘directions for use’ would you supply with your product?
Designed to arrive in two parts, Fold respects lower volume during transportation, considers exchangeability of the different parts and encourages/highlights the first interaction between user and product. By unfolding and placing the fan to the stand the tactile interaction with the warm and cold materials might establish an emotional bond between the user and the lamp.

What do you think is your product’s application?
Traditional, light plays a major role in Scandinavian culture, especially during shorter days in winter. You will hardly find a windowsill without a light which brings warmth and pleasure for both, inside and outside. Against this background, Fold is made for domestic use, and is therefore designed to create a pleasant ambient light.
The table lamp is a part of a bigger family which also consists of a wall lamp and two big volume pendants. Whereas the table lamp is mostly thought for the domestic and hospitality, the pendant is designed for bigger spaces and therefore also fits into the contract market.

When developing this product, was your main starting point the material, the shape or the function?
We wanted to design a lamp which could give a soft ambient light and to create an aesthetically pleasing object. The focus was therefore just as much focused on the function of the light as to combine feminine and masculine qualities throughout the choice of material, its manufacturing technique and visual appearance/shape.

What is the story behind your product? Was there a reason, a task, an inspiration, a desire?
Fold is inspired by the simple shape of a paper fan. We wanted to combine the familiar paper accessory with a light source, deliberately leaving the parts dividable. By unfolding and placing the paper shade into the aluminium stand we wanted to create a pleasant yet playful interaction between the user and the object. By contrasting paper and metal, craftsmen ship and industrial design, we wanted to find an aesthetic balance between feminine and masculine connoted materials. New light source solutions hereby give us the chance to work unrestrictedly with various shapes. In addition, we like the thought that the choice of different coloured paper and powder coatings or anodization for the aluminium base gives the chance to find its own individual version.

What do you think are the current trends in design and interior design?
It might not be a trend, but we hope that the current environmental situation encourages designers more and more to think in circular chains and the value of high product quality. We like the thought of long lasting design, and design which focus on certain aspects of sustainability and emotional connections in contrast to a fast-consuming world.

Why were you interested in the Pure Talents Contest?
The Pure Talent Contest has a broad audience and wide reach within Europe and abroad. It is one of the fewer contests which supports young, aspiring designers to introduce their work to the industry and the design world within a fair.
We are very thankful and looking forward to be part of PTC 2020, as for us, it gives us the unique chance to exhibit and introduce our work at a fair of that size, which we would not be able to afford on ourselves at the current stage of our education.

Fold | Thalea Schmalenberg (D) und Kasper Friis Egelund (DK)

Photo: Thalea Schmalenberg, Kasper Friis Egelund; Koelnmesse

Marie Kurstjens and Iva Coskun

Portrait Kurstjens Coskun

Marie Kurstjens (20) and Iva Coskun (20) met during their first semester of their Product Design degree course at the Bauhaus University in Weimar, Germany, where they have been studying since October 2018. The product submitted by the two up-and-coming product designers was developed as part of their project on the subject of “Collaboration” in the second semester. Since then, they have been working on the evolution of their table frame.

Levi | Marie Kurstjens and Iva Coskun

Levi: the worktable reimagined. The centrepiece of the design is the joint. The continuous range of adjustments at any angle enables the universal use of very different tabletop sizes and shapes. Levi is mobile, lightweight, intuitive, and can be assembled and disassembled without tools. Folded flat, the X-base is a space-saving design for easy stowing and, flat-packed, keeps storage and transport costs down.

Levi | Marie Kurstjens and Iva Coskun

Q&As

Which “instructions for use” would you include with your product?
"Levi" is intuitive, so that it requires no long instructions for use, which is why we would only like to add that "Levi" is a very loyal companion that can both quietly lean against the wall or be present in the room and adapt again and again to changing needs.

In what context do you see your product?
We have deliberately designed our frame for the needs of university students. However, it can be used for and transferred to all possible areas of work and life, and we think that this is exactly what is interesting about our "Levi" table frame.

When developing this product, what was your main starting point? The material, the shape or the function?
For us, the function was decisive for the final design.

What is the story behind your product? Was there an occasion, a task, an inspiration, a concern?
When researching, we especially took our own experiences and needs as a starting point. In our work environment, it is important that one can quickly dissolve and reorganise work formations. This is because we work both alone and in teams and groups. Our worktables at the university were too heavy and couldn't be adapted to our working conditions. We wanted to make work easier for our fellow students and for ourselves, create an attractive work atmosphere and strengthen teamwork. Levi represents a practical alternative here.

What do you think are the current trends in design and interior design?
We can currently see that no area of design can distance itself from the theme of sustainability. The trend is toward natural materials, as well as toward experimentation with novel and sustainable alternatives. Circular design is a large, important theme, as is the focus on the durability and multifunctionality of products.

What makes the Pure Talents Contest so interesting to you?
For us it is especially valuable to establish contacts through the trade fair and the Pure Talents Contest, independent of our familiar university environment.
We also find the possibility exciting to experience the course of a trade fair from beginning to end and to be able to contribute our part to this.

Video Kurstjens and Coskun

Tim Krahmer

Tim Krahmer

Tim Krahmer is an internationally award-winning post-industrial designer and inventor from north Germany who has worked in the automotive industry and taught in higher education, among other roles. As a designer, he wants to have a positive impact on the world and therefore constantly asks himself what implications a potential design solution might have for the future.

Tenok | Tim Krahmer

An open source vacuum cleaner that you can build yourself: More than half of all vacuum cleaners are functional when they are thrown away. A waste? Absolutely – but also an opportunity to make something useful again from what appears to be rubbish! By means of a 3D-printed adapter, Tenok can be equipped with used vacuum cleaner parts from nearly all manufacturers. The detailed online construction manual is designed to encourage even people without technical expertise to make one.

Produkt-Tim Krahmer

Photo: Tim Krahmer; Koelnmesse

Q&As

Which “instructions for use” would you include with your product?
Of course the online assembly instructions
In other words, you have to build Tenok yourself. Established companies have little interest in offering a model that can be repaired indefinitely and doesn’t need manufacturer-specific spare parts and consumables.

In what context do you see your product?
If you need a vacuum cleaner, you simply buy one and that’s it. In any case, at least for a few years until you get the urge to replace it. If you get tired of passive consumption, you can build a Tenok instead. It will only develop more character over time with a few scrapes and, to top it off, can be easily repaired and modified. At the same time, you also gain basic knowledge in woodworking, 3D printing, sewing, etc., while building it. Since detailed instructions are provided, you don’t even need experience in these areas – but it would be best to have access to an open workshop or makerspace.

When developing this product, what was your main starting point? The material, the shape or the function?
The material because the vacuum cleaner is equipped with used parts. With adjustable adapters, you use motors and parts from various manufacturers for your own Tenok. However, it’s also no coincidence that Tenok is a wooden box. It can be easily put together by a lay person and, unlike conventional plastic spaceship-like vacuum cleaners, ages gracefully.

What is the story behind your product?
At the start of this project, I just wanted to work with things that were obsolete and searched through an electronic waste collection site for usable parts. There were a remarkably larger number of vacuum cleaners there and I decided to remove the motors from seven models to test whether they still worked. All of them worked perfectly. I then did some research and found a recent British study, which showed that over half of all the vacuum cleaners thrown out still work. I see the components in the discarded devices as a potential resource and Tenok renders them usable through its adaptive design.

What do you think are the current trends in design and interior design?
I find the democratizing effects of 3D printing, Arduino and similar tools very exciting. Such technological developments put the concept of the producer who makes things for passive consumers to the test, just like the internet has done with traditional mass media and its audience.

What makes the Pure Talents Contest so interesting to you?
I think it’s great that this competition has been a forum for exciting, unconventional design solutions for many years. Many of the projects seen here surprise us with creative approaches and solutions that allow us to see and question everyday things in a completely new way. That is good.

Video Tim Krahmer

Sho Ota

Portrait_Sho Ota

Sho Ota is a Japanese Designer. After working as an artisan and a designer at a wooden furniture maker in Japan, he came to the Netherlands, where he graduated from the Contextual Design Department of the Design Academy Eindhoven with a master´s degree in 2018. Sho Ota is based with his design studio, Studio Sho Ota, in Eindhoven.

According to the Grain | Sho Ota

Wooden seats for appreciating the materiality of wood: This project highlights the quality of a wood knot, the character of which is often treated as a defect and neutralised in industrial processing. By chiselling down 12mm from a flat surface and chiselling out the knots, its three-dimensionality and texture are enhanced and its unique materiality becomes palpable to the casual viewer. The surface can now reveal more secrets and help the user imagine what this material once looked like in its natural state.

Produkt_Sho Ota

Photo: Sho Ota; Koelnmesse

Q&As

Which ‘directions for use’ would you supply with your product?

They are seats — a bench and a stool for appreciating material by sitting on them.

What do you think is your product’s field?
Furniture.

When developing this product, was your main starting point the material, the shape or the function?
The material.

What is the story behind your product? Was there a reason, a task, an inspiration, a desire?
I was shocked when I realized that a table initially thought to be made from solid wood was rather made from fake wood. This is because I have 6 years of experience in making wooden furniture and I had been using the table for already one year. The outside is covered with a printed wood sheet, and inside is particleboard. The technique to disguise fake as real is developing, and we are satisfied with this economically and ecologically. I then questioned why I need to use real wood when fake wood can function so well as an alternative. I began to explore what can come from real wood that cannot be fulfilled with a fake alternative. My answer is to show the tactility that comes from the material of real wood.

What do you think are the current trends in design and interior design?
I don’t know the current trends in design but I hope to see a movement focusing on materiality and tactility that has to be experienced in real life, beyond digital media like Instagram.

Why were you interested in the Pure Talents Contest?
I am curious to exhibit among other great designers.

Qing Deng

Portrait_Qing Deng

Qing Deng is a Chinese student of product design at the Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing.

Aspirator | Qing Deng

Using yelling to make a seat for reducing negative emotions: People who suppress emotions are prone to mental illness. The Aspirator venting machine is a psychological vacuum cleaner that helps people vent negative emotions. When people are unhappy, shouting or saying something to the Aspirator will make the airbag inflate. In the end, people can create a seat made from their own negative emotions and relax in it to find solutions to their problems. (

Produkt Qing Deng

Photo: Qing Deng; Koelnmesse

Q&As

Which ‘directions for use’ would you supply with your product?
The venting machine Aspirator is a psychological vacuum cleaner which helps people to vent negative emotions. When people are unhappy, shouting or saying something to the venting machine will inflate the airbag. At the the end, people can get a seat which is made from their own negative emotions and relax on it to think about the solutions of their problems.

What do you think is your product’s field?
Aspirator can be used in public places, such as parks and work places.

When developing this product, was your main starting point the material, the shape or the function?
The function.

What is the story behind your product? Was there a reason, a task, an inspiration, a desire?
When I was in college, I planned a trip with one of my friends. We were looking forward to having a nice trip, but unfortunately at the night before departure my friend couldn’t come for some reasons. In the next few days my lonely trip was also affected negatively. At that moment, I felt very bad, I wanted to shout out the negative emotions. I got inspired by that strong “shouting” feeling and designed the Aspirator to help ease the negative emotions.

What do you think are the current trends in design and interior design?
More interesting and intelligent.

Why were you interested in the Pure Talents Contest?
Not only does the contest give me the opportunity to show my work, but also to meet very interesting designers and to get new ideas.

Nelita Olsson

Portrait-Nelita Olsson

Nelita Olsson (29) is currently studying for her master´s degree in Industrial Design at Ingvar Kamprad Design Centrum at Lund University in Sweden. As a designer she strives for simplicity and believes that form and function are closely related. Her product Skilja was created in a project collaboration with IKEA.

Skilja | Nelita Olsson

A flexible wall for a flexible home: The household has gone through big changes over time, and as we move into the future, flexibility might become a greater need. Skilja was created to support this future flexibility. Skilja is a modular wall, and with rods, joints and plywood sheets (rice or coconut paper), you can mount it to facilitate the current needs of your home.

Produkt Nelita Olsson

Photo: Nelita Olsson; Koelnmesse

Q&As

Which ‘directions for use’ would you supply with your product?
The initial idea for Skilja was to create privacy, divide space and create a room inside a room. Since it is flexible and modular it can be used any way you like it.

What do you think is your product’s application?
The main focus throughout the project has always been the home and its needs, and therefore Skilja is primarily designed to fit this area.

When developing this product, was your main starting point the material, the shape or the function?
The main starting point was the function and how it could be designed to be modular in an easy and understandable way.

What is the story behind your product? Was there a reason, a task, an inspiration, a desire?
Skilja was a university project in collaboration with IKEA. As IKEA is a company with a strong focus on the home I decided to look at the changes of the home from the past to the future. My desire was to create something flexible to fit the needs of the home as they are ever changing.

What do you think are the current trends in design and interior design?
As people are more aware of how consumerism is affecting the environment I think quality, sustainability and simplicity in products are desired. Green products are not a trend but a shift in peoples mind set.

Why were you interested in the Pure Talents Contest?
The Pure Talents Contest is a great opportunity to display my work to a broader audience.

Photo: Nelita Olsson; Koelnmesse

Sofia Souidi

Portrait Sofia Souidi

Sofia Souidi from Berlin graduated from the Design for Manufacture platform at the Royal College of Art, London, with a Master’s in Product Design in 2017. She founded her design studio in the same year. Having previously been shortlisted for the Pure Talents Contest in 2018, the designer has now been selected a second time. She describes her design style as reduced, sometimes with an idiosyncratic character.

JOJO | Sofia Souidi

JOJO is a lamp that is wound up by a string and emits a bright, warm light. Within a short period of time, the light becomes dimmer before it goes out. The idea for the project is that the change in light can create a sense of time. The playful interaction of the pulling to turn the light on is reminiscent of a yo-yo, or “Jojo” in German, and gives the lamp its name and its shape.

Produkt Sofia Souidi

Foto: Sofia Souidi; Koelnmesse

Q&As

Which ‘directions for use’ would you supply with your product?

The material is 2.50 m long and 1.50 m wide. The two ends of the material are tied together by a simple knot and drawn over the frame, thereby creating the surface of the seat.

What do you think is your product’s application?

The chair can be used in the contract sector or in a private home.

When developing this product, was your main starting point the material, the shape or the function?

Taking the history of Bauhaus as a starting point, we designed a chair that establishes a connection between function, material and form. The basic idea is to create transparency through the elegant lines of the frame, but that is then set in contrast with the soft material.

What is the story behind your product? Was there a desire?

The chair was developed as part of my final Bachelor thesis. My objective was to establish a connection to the theme “100 years of Bauhaus”.

What do you think are the current trends in design and interior design?

There is a trend towards digitalisation. However, analogue things are gaining a special status as a result.

Why were you interested in the Pure Talents Contest?

The Pure Talents Contest provides an amazing platform for designers because it is an opportunity to present nominated works at the Interior Business Event in Cologne.

Da Zeng

Portrait Da Zeng

Da Zeng is a Chinese design student currently studying in Bejing at the Central Academy of Fine Arts. His motivation for design derives from thinking about innovative ways of living, how to make better use of natural and environmentally friendly materials, and how to develop the characteristics of new materials.

Uion | Da Zeng

Explore and create a kind of Oriental style using the universal language of design: The appearance revolves around the shape structure of the letter "U" and suggests the shape of traditional Oriental armchairs, highlighting a sense of rhythm between straight lines and curves. In terms of material technology, the rattan of different thicknesses is made with a hot bending process, and all the unnecessary structural parts of the seat are removed, so that the use of materials is minimised, showcasing a simple and quiet, natural beauty.

Produkt Da Zeng

Q&As

Which ‘directions for use’ would you supply with your product?
The product Uion can be used for sitting, decorating, or however else you like.

What do you think is your product’s context?
The cane furniture of contemporary Oriental style that can be used in a habitable room.

When developing this product, was your main starting point the material, the shape or the function?
The material.

What is the story behind your product? Was there a reason, a task, an inspiration, a desire?
The idea comes from my curiosity and thinking about rattan material. Rattan is a natural environmental material. Its appearance has a modern linear structure characteristic. The deformation is achieved by hot bending. Different colors, different shapes can present different temperaments and states. The product Uion tries to present the unique Oriental temperament with the modern simple linear form. It extracts the characteristic appearance of the traditional armchair, and removes all the unnecessary structural components of the chair, minimizing the use of materials, to present a simple and quiet natural beauty.
What do you think are the current trends in design and interior design?
The design is diverse, and I think innovative lifestyles and how to use biodegradable recycled materials are timeless themes.

Why were you interested in the Pure Talents Contest?
The opportunity to receive constructive criticism on an international level and in front of a large audience is the most valuable to me. Thanks very much for the platform of the Pure Talents Contest.

Video Da Zeng

Peter Otto Vosding

Portrait Peter Otto Vosding

Peter Otto Vosding is a German designer based in Cologne. He studied Industrial Design in Darmstadt, Product Design and Process Development in Cologne. On basis of a scholarship from the IKEA foundation he went to the Ingvar Kamprad Design Centrum at Lund University in Sweden for an exchange semester. VOSDING Industrial Design, founded in 2017, was selected as German Design Award Newcomer Finalist.

PIPE-LINE und SofShelf | Peter Otto Vosding

PIPE-LINE is an extending table whose mechanism serves as the central design feature. Two pipes flow into each other akin to a telescopic rod and function simultaneously as the extending mechanism and frame. The visible screws in the sides and the demonstrative display of all the functional parts make PIPE-LINE a unique extending table. The colouring indicates the table’s function and highlights the parts to be moved.

Product Peter Otto Vosding

Photo: Peter Otto Vosding; Koelnmesse

Q&As

PIPE-LINE - Which ‘directions for use’ would you supply with your product? Use of the pull-out mechanism is intuitive.
The table doesn’t hide any of its functions and makes very effective use of visual signs. This version can be easily extended from a 6-seater to an 8-seater – and it can be realised in entirely different dimensions, too.

What do you think is your product’s application?
Of course, an extendable table traditionally functions as a dining table, at which sometimes more and sometimes fewer people are seated.

When developing this product, what was your main starting point? The material, the shape or the function?
This design was 100% focused on function. The pull-out mechanism is not hidden behind the frame; instead it becomes the visual and functional focal point of the product in the form of a large tube.

What is the story behind your product?
Was there a reason, a task, an inspiration, a desire?
The initial question centred on what practical solutions there were to modify the geometry of a table’s framework in such a way that it would function as a pull-out mechanism. Now the framework has completely disappeared and the mechanism has become a design element instead.

What do you think are the current trends in design and interior design?
Sustainability has been a theme for some time now, and that won’t change for a long time to come. Can it really still be called a trend? In any event, it has marked the beginning of an important process of engaging in new ways of thinking, revealing all kinds of things, from greenwashing to real solutions.

What makes the Pure Talents Contest so interesting to you?
I’ve always tried to take part in every competition for up-and-coming designers, whenever I had suitable projects. And it’s paid off a few times. Now it’s finally worked at the Pure Talents Contest, too! For me, the award is particularly valuable, because it means I can present my designs at imm cologne. Of course, as someone who has chosen to live in Cologne, it’s now also a home game for me.

SoftShelf is a minimalist shelving system. Upholstered walls with functional stitching details form the frame for shelves, drawers and many other elements.
These features make the shelving system a universal product for furnishing the most diverse spaces. It creates an inviting atmosphere while naturally also assuming the function of acoustic elements

Produkt Peter Otto Vosding

Photo: Peter Otto Vosding; Koelnmesse

Filip Lenarcik

Portrait Filip Lenarcik

After graduating in architecture at Wrocław University of Science and Technology in February 2019, Filip Lenarcik (23) recently enrolled at the Academy of Art and Design in Wrocław, Poland, to study design. In terms of design he is especially interested in modular and flat-packed furniture, and aims to create simple, elegant, pleasant and made to last pieces, with attention to detail.

Flow Chair | Filip Lenarcik

Flow Chair reinvents well-known flat-pack furniture. It consists of four main elements and eight joints. Assembly is fast and intuitive. It can also be reassembled multiple times without sacrificing strength. Flow shows that flat-pack furniture doesn’t need to be frustrating and of low quality. It can also offer a timeless look, honest materials and durability. Details, such as brass joints, are made by hand, which gives the chair a unique character.

Product Filip Lenarcik

Photo: Filip Lenarcik; Koelnmesse

Q&As

Which ‘directions for use’ would you supply with your product?
Sit down and relax.

What do you think is your product’s field?
The chair is suitable for residential spaces as well as hospitality industry.

When developing this product, was your main starting point the material, the shape or the function?
First was a simple sketch of a silhouette but after that the details, materials and functionality were developed simultaneously.

What is the story behind your product? Was there a reason, a task, an inspiration, a desire?
Flow Chair is an answer to poor quality, frustrating, flat-packed furniture. The idea was to make a chair that can be assembled and disassembled quickly but at the same time is durable, timeless and made from highest quality materials.

What do you think are the current trends in design and interior design?
High quality materials, craftsmanship, sustainability, consciousness.

Why were you interested in the Pure Talents Contest?
It’s an amazing opportunity to show my design to a large audience and meet like-minded people.

Hiroyuki Morita

Portrait Hiroyuki Morita

Hiroyuki Morita (28), is a Japanese Industrial Designer, Furniture Designer and Founder of a design studio who got nominated the second time for the Pure Talents Contest. Morita gained a Master degree at the ECAL in Switzerland. As a designer he aims to merge the future and the past harmonically. For this he is investigating the history of technological evolutions and traditional culture.

OMIT | Hiroyuki Morita

OMIT is a non-electric vacuum cleaner that works by small action. It does not have the same power as a conventional vacuum cleaner but works silently and is handy. It can be used at any time of the day and in any place without electricity. The idea was inspired by my own daily life. Living with flatmates, I usually cannot use the vacuum cleaner on weekdays because of the noise. With OMIT, life can be less noisy and handier by omitting electricity.

Product Hiroyuki Morita

Photo: Hiroyuki Morita; Koelnmesse

Q&As

Which ‘directions for use’ would you supply with your product?
OMIT is a non-electric vacuum cleaner that works by small action. It does not have the same power as a general vacuum cleaner, but it works silently and is handy. It can be used during any time of the day, and in any place without electric supply, for example in a car. OMIT supports you with your cleaning habit and makes the cleaning much easier.

What do you think is your product’s field?
Every electric device can be non-electric. Developing countries are an ideal field to explore the necessity of it.

When developing this product, was your main starting point the material, the shape or the function?
Function. This is the biggest challenge of this project. As I have written on the development description, I had considered several other principles. It was very important that the mechanism has to be able to accumulate power. The idea of the combination of planetary gears and torque springs is taken from a car toy, which works with small torque springs.

What is the story behind your product? Was there a reason, a task, an inspiration, a desire?
The idea came out of my own daily life. Living with flatmates, I usually cannot use the vacuum cleaner during weekdays because of the noise. This made me investigate the problem of vacuum cleaners. I realized that about 70% of users can use vacuum cleaners only at the weekend, because of the noise and trouble with cables. Even rechargeable ones can be forgotten to be recharged. However, more than 80% of people use it for house cleaning. Furthermore, I found out that before the appearance of electric vacuum cleaners, manual vacuum cleaners were used in the 19th century. So I thought vacuum cleaners can be less noisy and more handy by omitting electricity.

What do you think are the current trends in design and interior design?
In the field of interior design and consumer products, the people realize what authentic beauty is. The meaning of “authentic beauty” is not only seen from a visual point of view. It is including environment responsibility, mental health, social community, traditional culture etc. As a designer, I could say that we have to observe deeply our society and have to direct where we can explore. In order to direct to the next stage, we need to investigate history and advanced technology at the same time. This investigation tells us the right point of marge future and past in our present life.

Why were you interested in the Pure Talents Contest?
I am interested in the Pure Talents Contest because the finalists get the possibility to exhibit at the imm cologne. Through the contest, I would like to find the clients or partnerships which have the same philosophy as I do, so together we can explore the “authentic beauty” which I mentioned before.

Video Hiroyuki Morita

Anton Mikkonen

Portrait Anton Mikkonen

Anton Mikkonen graduated with 1st class honours from Furniture & Product Design (BA) at The Sir John Cass Faculty of Art, Architecture and Design (London Metropolitan University). The Finnish designer experiments with a diverse range of materials, techniques, and methods, in both, design and making. The core of his work lies within a simplistic yet functional design.

Udon | Anton Mikkonen

The Udon Stool is made of solid ash wood and has unique aesthetics acquired with a 2D CNC machine. The clever use of the router bit enables the distinctive shape of both the seat and the legs. The stool is constructed from a total of five pieces, which are cut out with a CNC machine, resulting in a highly efficient manufacturing process. The stool aims to create a sense of playfulness using traditional materials and modern manufacturing techniques.

Product Anton Mikkonen

Photo: Anton Mikkonen; Koelnmesse

Q&As

Which ‘directions for use’ would you supply with your product?
Have a seat, explore and enjoy.

What do you think is your product’s context?
I believe all pieces within your interiors should be meaningful and bring joy. Often a stool is seen as an additional seating, rather than to be celebrated. Don’t hide your stools.

When developing this product, was your main starting point the material, the shape or the function?
The starting point was actually the manufacturing process, in this case 2D CNC machining, which I find very interesting. The design and the aesthetics started to develop in the workshop, where I feel the most inspired after multiple tests with various router cutters.

What is the story behind your product? Was there a reason, a task, an inspiration, a desire?
The Udon Stool started off as a curious exploration of the endless possibilities of a simple 2D CNC machine combined with traditional, commonly used material and off the shelf router bit. I believe the aesthetical language of the Udon Stool has a lot of potential, which is why it is still an ongoing project of mine. I am a curious designer who works with a multitude of materials and techniques immersing myself into the making process where every project aims to be experimental.

Why were you interested in the Pure Talents Contest?
International exhibition with good exposure and possible future collaborations.

Video Anton Mikkonen

Wing Yin Ng

Portrait Wing Yin Ng

Born in Hong Kong in 1989 Wing Yin Ng is currently living in Finland where he is studying for his master´s degree in interior architecture at School of Arts, Design & Architecture, Aalto University. With his work, that does not only focus on spatial, furniture and object design, but also on art, he is searching and exploring the relationship of form and aesthetic.

CURTAIN | Wing Yin Ng

A modular space divider design based on the exploration of curves and structures. The shape was inspired by and expresses the energetic flow of sea waves, which is natural and boundless. This is done by connecting the arches in different directions to create a wavy frame that looks like a curtain. The structure allows unlimited extension lengths and changes of direction. CURTAIN, the distorted frame makes it possible to look at space from a different perspective.

Product Wing Yin Ng

Photo: Wing Yin Ng; Koelnmesse

Q&As

Which ‘directions for use’ would you supply with your product?
The modular structure makes it easy to assemble and create extensions. Please enjoy the “Curtain” by looking at it in different directions.

What do you think is your product’s context?
“Curtain” is a decorative space divider for indoor space. It’s something in between sculpture and furniture design.

When developing this product, was your main starting point the material, the shape or the function?
The starting points of my product are to be seen more in form and shape. However, I think aesthetics created, based on form and shape, are also part of the function.

What is the story behind your product? Was there a reason, a task, an inspiration, a desire?
It was inspired by the sea. Sea waves have no straight line and have no ends. There are always changes but the changes are calm and gentle. I tried to analyse and visualise the form and create the structure from this inspiration.

What do you think are the current trends in design and interior design?
I am not sure if there are any right answers. Trends is not a good word for designers or artists as it may avoid new creations and ideas.

Why were you interested in the Pure Talents Contest?
It would be a great opportunity for me as a designer showing my work on an international platform and to make new connections.

Video Wing Yin NG

Dennis Cheung und Whitnie Yvette Lau

Portrait Whitnie Yvette Lau and Dennis Cheung

Dennis Cheung, registered architect, and Whitnie Yvette Lau, product designer, are part of the Studio RYTE, an energetic and innovative design studio comprised of agile and passionate inventers, architects, designers and engineers, based in Hong Kong. The multi-disciplinary design team is dedicated to harness technology and craftsmanship to redefine mundane urban objects, materials and space.

Sofie Leenen

Portrait Sofie Leenen

Sofie Leenen (born 1993) is an Amsterdam-based designer, material researcher and textile designer with a spatial purpose. After she graduated from the Design Academy Eindhoven in 2018, she worked as a freelance designer for a number of studios in the fields of architectural, spacial and exhibition design, and the TextielLab at the TextielMuseum in Tilburg focusing on weaving.

braided weave | Sofie Leenen (NL)

Handmade, braided, woven carpet that can transform into a basket: This project started as an investigation of the similarities between textile weaving and basket braiding. The constructions of the techniques differ greatly, and each technique has its own characteristics of complexity and identity. The carpet has a flat surface with a circular contour. A rope is pulled through the loops at the ends. When the rope is pulled, the contour of the circle comes together as a 3-dimensional shape.

Product Sofie Leenen

Photo: Sofie Leenen; Koelnmesse

Q&As

Which ‘directions for use’ would you supply with your product?
The first product that emerged from the braided weave research is a handmade carpet that can transform into a basket. I focused on designing a product that is changeable in function and scale assume in a space.

What do you think is your product’s context?

My projects start by questioning how, but also wy things are developed. I look at the balance between the physical experiment into certain crafts and production techniques, durability of materials and detail in relation to scale. I belief it is important to first take a step back to understand how the basis has been formed, by reflecting this research I move further towards a new application. During this process I work closely together with the makers, surroundings and industry. They take me into their specialization and I analyze, practice, collect, structure and document this process in a visual manner towards a design. The products I design often have a connection with an interior purpose; I find it fascinating to work in a spatial scale to ensure the needs of a product function.

When developing this product, was your main starting point the material, the shape or the function?
I mainly focused on the technical part of textile. I started an investigation research on the similarities and contradictions between weaving textile and basketry braiding and tried to combine these two techniques into one new technic: breaded weave.

What is the story behind your product? Was there a reason, a task, an inspiration, a desire?
During my research I saw that the construction of the weaving textile and basketry braiding techniques are quite different and each technique has its own characteristics in complexity and identity. This inspired me to experiment with the function, shape, traction and dimension of a woven fabric. I think it is time for new developments for the textile industry.

What do you think are the current trends in design and interior design?
The most important question is no longer whether something is beautiful or not, I think the story of origin, functionality and quality are the most important elements. Be more conscious and critical on the need of products, the use of products and the way how we develop in a sustainable way.

Why were you interested in the Pure Talents Contest?
I think this is a great opportunity to show my project to a large professional audience. I would like to open a dialogue with the industry to discover more opportunities and directions. I also think it is a good opportunity to present my work to a jury. It is a deadline to work towards and a possibility to reflect on my research process so far. It makes me think about how I want to continue with this project in the future.

Gustav Rossander and Moa Lundfeldt

Portrait Moa Lundfeldt

Gustav Rossander (25) und Moa Lundfeldt (23) share the same interests and ambition. Both have a bachelor degree in mechanical engineering, and are currently studying at the master program of industrial design at Lund University. Their style is described by them as functional.

Efterlyst | Moa Lundfeldt

Efterlyst is a stationery area light that can function as a mobile light source for improving quality of life for people that are temporarily off the grid. The lamp continues to illuminate during a power outage due to its integrated battery. The charging station and lamp are designed as a unit, encouraging the user to connect the two again after usage to ensure that the battery is always charged.

Product Moa Lundfeldt

Photo: Moa Lundfeldt; Koelnmesse

Q&As

Which ‘directions for use’ would you supply with your product?
Efterlyst is a stationery area light for the home, with the function of being used as a mobile light source.

What do you think is your product’s application?
Efterlyst was designed as a mobile light source, aiming to improve the quality of life for people during power outage.

When developing this product, was your main starting point the material, the shape or the function?
The starting point of the product was the function.

What is the story behind your product? Was there a reason, a task, an inspiration, a desire?
The projects origin came from a short brief provided by IKEA: “Improve life by using inspiration from off the grid solutions”. We chose to focus on improving life for people living temporarily off the grid. From research we then found out that the absence of light had the greatest impact on most users during a power outage.
Further, to make the product more approachable, we put a lot of emphasis on preventing the lamp from being categorized as a survivor and/or prepper product, as preparing for something bad has a tendency to go against the human nature.
Finally, the shape is inspired by older candlelights in brass.

What do you think are the current trends in design and interior design?
We think that one upcoming trend amongst customers is the awareness about sustainable consumption. Sustainability is not a new trend per se, but we believe that the behavior changes in customers consumptions are starting to influence the field of design.

Why were you interested in the Pure Talents Contest?
We think that the Pure Talents Contest gives us a great opportunity to introduce Efterlyst to a broader audience and to network with other designers.

Video: Moa Lundfeldt